Is Telling Your Employer About Your Breakup a Good Idea?

Should You Tell Your Employer About Your Break-up?

Leaving your issues outside of the workplace is usually a good idea. It’s rarely useful to come to work still angry about something that happened on your morning drive or upset about something that happened the night before. Ultimately, the workplace is generally best-kept secret from your family and personal life, but it’s becoming increasingly difficult to keep the two worlds apart. This is particularly true in a time when you’re constantly talking to your work colleagues over instant chat and social media.

If something significant happens in your personal life, like your marriage comes to an end or you break up with your partner, it’s hard not to take your emotions with you into the office. The question is, do you tell your employer about the problem, or just ignore it?

Dealing with the Divorce Issue at Work

As divorce numbers continue to rise, it’s safe to assume that you either know someone who is going through a divorce, or you’re dealing with it yourself. It’s imperative during this difficult time in your life that you maintain as much consistency as possible – which also means holding onto your career. Knowing who to tell about your situation can help you to maintain as much comfort as possible in this complicated period of your life.

Although sharing the details of your personal life with your colleagues might not seem like much fun, there are benefits to telling your employer about your divorce. For instance, there’s a good chance that you’re going to be more emotional and less productive for a while. Giving the people around you a reason for your change in behaviour will help them to understand your issue and be more patient with you. Additionally, sharing information about your divorce with people at work can also mean that you end up with more support around you too – particularly if you’re close with your coworkers.

How Your Colleagues Can Help

Think of it this way, if you tell the receptionist at work that you’re dealing with a divorce, then they can filter your calls for you, and help you to decide when you want to deal with personal calls that might send you into an emotional spiral. Additionally, if your ex-spouse tries to call you, your receptionist can help you to avoid unnecessary contact during this time.

If your manager is a supportive person, then they can also give you additional guidance and leeway during your divorce, so you feel as though you’re under less pressure while you deal with a very emotional situation. If your manager isn’t a very supportive person, however, you might need to avoid telling them anything, as there’s a risk they could use your sensitivity against you.

Telling your colleagues and teammates about your divorce can help you to create a valuable support system that you can use during your break-up. This information will also warn the people in your workplace that you may be distracted.

Dealing with a Difficult Breakup

If you dealt with abuse or violence in your relationship prior to your breakup, it may be particularly important to share some details with a manager or trusted person at work. This will ensure that there are more people around you that are ready to look out for your wellbeing. For instance, if you don’t turn up for work one day, and your manager knows you’ve been threatened by your ex before, they can act on your behalf.

Ultimately, there are a lot of benefits associated with sharing your situation with the people in your workplace when and if you can. However, it’s usually a good idea to be as discreet as possible. Remember that telling people about your situation and making everyone aware of the issue that you’re dealing with can be a good idea, but you don’t need to tell them your life story. Decide in advance how much information you want to share, and who you want to reach out to during this difficult time.

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